Alaska’s Homesteders: By Martha Markey
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Alaska’s Homesteders: By Martha Markey


Join Bob and me on our two trips to Alaska from Michigan. How two nine-inch frying pans got us up the hill near Scotty Creek in 1951 and how we crossed the approach to Bear Creek Bridge after rushing flood-waters had created a twenty-five-foot dry chasm in 1953.Learn about our moving onto our homestead in…;





Join Bob and me on our two trips to Alaska from Michigan. How two nine-inch frying pans got us up the hill near Scotty Creek in 1951 and how we crossed the approach to Bear Creek Bridge after rushing flood-waters had created a twenty-five-foot dry chasm in 1953.
Learn about our moving onto our homestead in 1956, twelve miles from Fairbanks, and then a half-mile over a path thru the trees created by long forgotten engineers, Find out how little by little we developed the land: by building a road, pounding down a well, building a house, and in time obtaining a patent, in spite of long cold winters, a forest fire, earthquakes and a flood.
Read about the responses we received from the wild life that were there first: The big horned owls that sat in the tall trees, with eyes searching for movement on the ground; the gray lynx with long limbs and big feet that carry it effortlessly over the terrain; the red fox that birthed her kits in a den on the creek-bank, and moose that peeked in our window in the middle of winter.
Join us on sightseeing trips to view Alaska’s many wonders, when visitors come from the lower forty-eight: such as the stop at Worthington Glacier, were road crews used dozers to push the ice off the road. Explore with us, the ninety-two mile Denali Park Trail that took us to the base of Mt McKinley, the highest peak in North America.



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